• African Americans Kidney Disease Fact Sheet


    African Americans are nearly four times more likely than Caucasians to develop kidney failure,
    which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant.

    Kidney Disease in African Americans

    ■ An NKDEP survey of African Americans found that only eight percent named kidney disease
    as a consequence of high blood pressure, and only 17 percent named kidney disease as a
    consequence of diabetes. Of those surveyed who had high blood pressure and diabetes,
    only 10 percent and 29 percent, respectively, identified kidney disease as a negative
    consequence of not treating their conditions.

    ■ African Americans make up about 12 percent of the population but account for 32 percent of
    people with kidney failure.

    ■ Among new patients whose kidney failure was caused by high blood pressure, more than half
    (51.2 percent) are African American.

    ■ Among new patients whose kidney failure was caused by diabetes, almost one third
    (31.3 percent) are African American.

    ■ African-American men ages 20 to 29 are 10 times more likely to develop kidney failure due to
    high blood pressure than Caucasian men in the same age group. African-American men ages
    30 to 39 are about 14 times more likely to develop kidney failure due to high blood pressure
    than Caucasian men in the same age group.

    Kidney Disease in the United States

    ■ Approximately 20 million Americans have kidney disease.

    ■ Early kidney disease has no symptoms. If left undetected, it can progress to kidney failure with
    little or no warning.

    ■ By the end of 2003, more than 128,000 people were living with a kidney transplant, and
    almost 325,000 were on dialysis – a number that has nearly tripled since 1988.

    ■ Public and private spending to treat patients with kidney failure in the United States in 2003
    was $27.3 billion,1 up from around $22 billion in 2001.

    ■ The most common causes of kidney failure are diabetes and high blood pressure, together
    accounting for about 70 percent of new cases.

    ■ By 2030, more than 2 million people will be receiving treatment for kidney failure.

    ■ Kidney disease can be effectively treated if detected early. ACE (angiotensin-converting
    enzyme) inhibitors5,6,7,8 or ARBs9,10 (angiotensin receptor blockers) can prevent or slow
    progression of kidney disease to kidney failure.

    National Kidney Disease Education Program. NKDEP Survey of African-American Adults’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Related to Kidney Disease. National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2003. (Unpublished study)

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    African Americans And Kidney Disease
    May 13, 2014 – Due to high rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, Blacks and African Americans have an increased risk of developing kidney failure.
    Kidney Disease Risks Among African Americans
    African Americans are more at risk for kidney failure than any other race. More than 1 in 3 kidney failure patients living in the United States is African American. That is over 150,000 people!
    Gene Hastens Kidney Disease Progression In African-Americans
    A gene variant common in African-Americans predicts that people with that gene who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD) are twice as likely to progress to kidney failure as African-Americans without the high-risk gene and white people with CKD.
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    A gene variant common in African-Americans predicts that people with that gene who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD) are twice as likely to progress to kidney failure as African-Americans without the high-risk gene and white people with CKD.
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    Black Americans on Medicaid are far less likely to receive a living-donor kidney transplant than patients with private health insurance, a new study finds.
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    African-Americans with two copies of the APOL1 gene have about a 4 percent lifetime risk of developing a form of kidney disease, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health.
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    Black Americans are more likely than whites to have a condition in which the kidneys spill protein into the urine, which may help explain why blacks are four times more likely than whites to develop kidney failure, a new study suggests.
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